Fingerprinting Foreigners in Japan

30Nov07

Japan began a program on November 15th of fingerprinting and photographing all foreign visitors to Japan, including foreign residents of Japan, every time they enter the country.

The measures were enacted supposedly for anti-terrorism reasons, but the New York Times writes that the decision could affect businesses if  companies find the regulations prohibitive and businessmen visiting Japan are greeted by hourlong delays at immigration.

More generally, the measures could add to the atmosphere of insularity and sometimes xenophobia, felt by some foreign residents.  At a time when aging Japan needs more foreign residents, does the law help or hurt Japan?  Is Japan really a terrorist target?

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2 Responses to “Fingerprinting Foreigners in Japan”

  1. I’m a Permanent Resident of Japan, from the UK and have lived here since 1994. Japan has never been attacked by foreign terrorists and if such attack is likely it will happen overseas. Japan has been attacked by home grown terrorists. The introduction of fingerprinting is against the Japanese Constitution which affords protection to all peoples who are in Japan and not just Japanese nationals.

  2. Well, I find it extraordinarily interesting.Good luck to all of you. And I’m sure you’ll do fine. Really. Just fine.


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